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If you are looking for a Philadelphia website design firm, look no further than Trustdyx. We've developed hundreds of professional website and marketing solutions for businesses in and around Montgomery and beyond. Our team knows that it takes to develop great looking websites which function well and get found online.

Philadelphia Website Design

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Trustdyx is an innovative, U.S.-based website developer, proud to serve the entire Philadelphia region with blazing fast, beautiful and affordable websites. Our in-house programmers and web designers have led businesses across the nation to great success; we take great pride in being a leading Philadelphia web design company.

No matter what industry you’re in, Trustdyx can work directly with you to build a solution for your needs. Your new website will get your Philadelphia-based business the attention it deserves.

Your new Trustdyx website is built from the ground-up to be:

We start the website development process by having an open conversation about your website goals. We’ll show you previous client websites as examples and offer suggestions on how your website can be built within your budget and timeframe. Unlike other Philadelphia website design firms, we spend time getting to know you so we can provide the best solution, rather than making your website fit a pre-determined agenda.

No matter how large your company or website design project, we have the testimonials and portfolio to prove we can handle it. When you work with Trustdyx, you’ll be working with one of the most trusted website design firms in the industry.

Contact us today to learn more about what Trustdyx can do for your Philadelphia company. Our highly trained web development experts are standing by and we look forward to working with you.

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Philadelphia, known colloquially as Philly, is the largest city in the U.S. state and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the sixth-most populous U.S. city, with a 2018 census-estimated population of 1,584,138. Since 1854, the city has been coterminous with Philadelphia County, the most populous county in Pennsylvania and the urban core of the eighth-largest U.S. metropolitan statistical area, with over 6 million residents as of 2017. Philadelphia is also the economic and cultural anchor of the greater Delaware Valley, located along the lower Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis. The Delaware Valley's population of 7.2 million ranks it as the eighth-largest combined statistical area in the United States.

William Penn, an English Quaker, founded the city in 1682 to serve as capital of the Pennsylvania Colony. Philadelphia played an instrumental role in the American Revolution as a meeting place for the Founding Fathers of the United States, who signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776 at the Second Continental Congress, and the Constitution at the Philadelphia Convention of 1787. Several other key events occurred in Philadelphia during the Revolutionary War including the First Continental Congress, the preservation of the Liberty Bell, the Battle of Germantown, and the Siege of Fort Mifflin. Philadelphia remained the nation's largest city until being overtaken by New York City in 1790; the city was also one of the nation's capitals during the revolution, serving as temporary U.S. capital while Washington, D.C. was under construction. In the 19th century, Philadelphia became a major industrial center and a railroad hub. The city grew from an influx of European immigrants, most of whom came from Ireland, Italy and Germany—the three largest reported ancestry groups in the city as of 2015. In the early 20th century, Philadelphia became a prime destination for African Americans during the Great Migration after the Civil War, as well as Puerto Ricans. The city's population doubled from one million to two million people between 1890 and 1950.

The Philadelphia area's many universities and colleges make it a top study destination, as the city has evolved into an educational and economic hub. As of 2019, the Philadelphia metropolitan area is estimated to produce a gross metropolitan product of $490 billion. Philadelphia is the center of economic activity in Pennsylvania and is home to five Fortune 1000 companies. The Philadelphia skyline is expanding, with a market of almost 81,900 commercial properties in 2016, including several nationally prominent skyscrapers. Philadelphia has more outdoor sculptures and murals than any other American city. Fairmount Park, when combined with the adjacent Wissahickon Valley Park in the same watershed, is one of the largest contiguous urban park areas in the United States. The city is known for its arts, culture, cuisine, and colonial history, attracting 42 million domestic tourists in 2016 who spent $6.8 billion, generating an estimated $11 billion in total economic impact in the city and surrounding four counties of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia has also emerged as a biotechnology hub.

Philadelphia is the birthplace of the United States Marine Corps, and is also the home of many U.S. firsts, including the first library . Philadelphia contains 67 National Historic Landmarks and the World Heritage Site of Independence Hall. The city became a member of the Organization of World Heritage Cities in 2015, as the first World Heritage City in the United States. Although Philadelphia is rapidly undergoing gentrification, the city actively maintains mitigation strategies to minimize displacement of homeowners in gentrifying neighborhoods.

The geographic center of Philadelphia is located approximately at 40° 0′ 34″ north latitude and 75° 8′ 0″ west longitude. The 40th parallel north passes through neighborhoods in Northeast Philadelphia, North Philadelphia, and West Philadelphia including Fairmount Park. The city encompasses 142.71 square miles, of which 134.18 square miles is land and 8.53 square miles, or 6%, is water. Natural bodies of water include the Delaware and Schuylkill rivers, the lakes in Franklin Delano Roosevelt Park, and Cobbs, Wissahickon, and Pennypack creeks. The largest artificial body of water is the East Park Reservoir in Fairmount Park.

According to the 2018 United States Census Bureau estimate, there were 1,584,138 people residing in Philadelphia, representing a 3.8% increase from the 2010 census. After the 1950 Census, when a record high of 2,071,605 was recorded, the city's population began a long decline. The population dropped to a low of 1,488,710 residents in 2006 before beginning to rise again. Between 2006 and 2017, Philadelphia added 92,153 residents. In 2017, the Census Bureau estimated that the racial composition of the city was 41.3% Black , 14.1% Hispanic or Latino, 7.1% Asian, 0.4% Native Americans, 0.05% Pacific Islanders, and 2.8% multiracial.

Source: Wikipedia